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Welcome to Our Parkinson's Place


I copy news articles pertaining to research, news and information for Parkinson's disease, Dementia, the Brain, Depression and Parkinson's with Dystonia. I also post about Fundraising for Parkinson's disease and events. I try to be up-to-date as possible. I have Parkinson's
diseases as well and thought it would be nice to have a place where
updated news is in one place. That is why I began this blog.
I am not responsible for it's contents, I am just a copier of information searched on the computer. Please understand the copies are just that, copies and at times, I am unable to enlarge the wording or keep it uniformed as I wish. This is for you to read and to always keep an open mind.
Please discuss this with your doctor, should you have any questions, or concerns. Never do anything without talking to your doctor. I do not make any money from this website. I volunteer my time to help all of us to be informed. Please No advertisers, and No Information about Herbal treatments. This is a free site for all.
Thank you.


Saturday, January 14, 2017

Parkour is now officially a sport – here’s to jumping for joy

January 12, 2017

Running, leaping and climbing through the city isn’t just a test of strength and stamina – it’s also now an official sport. Parkour – a form of urban acrobatics, originating in France – is now officially recognised by sports councils across Britain. On a practical level, this means that it can be on national educational curricula, apply for lottery funding and access the benefits enjoyed by other major sports.
This is a big step forward for the development of parkour, which already has about 35,000practitioners – or “traceurs” – in the UK alone. There’s no typical traceur; participants can range from very young children to those with Parkinson’s disease, and there are new people starting up all the time. 
As well as having obvious physical health benefits, parkour also continues to show signs in research of contributing to positive mental health. It’s often practised in groups, which fosters social bonds between people, as encouraging each other to engage with the city in a constructive way, and offering an exciting alternative to the lure of more nefarious and destructive group activities.

Dangerous game?

Not everyone sees it this way: some still regard the sport as dangerousanti-social and in some cases, even criminal. Yet evidence suggests that these fears might be misplaced. After all, every sport carries risks: in 2013, 15 people died while hill-walking, and in 2014, 113 people were killed while cycling. Any death is tragic, and all possible measures should be taken to make sure that activities are safe – but there’s no reason to think that parkour is much riskier than any other sport.

At the very core of parkour is its intense, visceral and creative connection with the environment; the feel of flesh on the city. Those who partake in the sport do so not from a desire to commit a crime, but to escape the daily routine and experience the city in different ways. Faced with an urban environment that is rapidly sacrificing public space to private capital, it’s inevitable that some traceurs will trespass. 



This doesn’t make parkour anti-social, though. Quite the opposite, in fact: it reaffirms the connection people can have with the city – one that is being lost in the competitive throng of contemporary urban life. The practice of parkour is still relatively free from the pressures of commodification and competition. It encourages people to work together, learn from each other and fleetingly reclaim city as a common civic space. 


Getting connected

Parkour also forms the basis of a growing global online community. This activity is predominantly practised by tech-savvy young people, who leverage the power of social media to improve their skills, learn new moves and showcase their talents to the rest of the world. Parkour’s popularity has a lot to do with the way it allows people to meld their online and offline worlds together. 
Innovation and creativity are two of parkour’s major strengths as a sport, and many online videos, Hollywood films and computer games incorporate the spectacular physicality of parkour into their stories and imagery. As such, parkour is at the leading edge of sporting activity, blending as it does physical prowess, digital literacy and visual creativity.
For all these reasons, parkour’s recognition by UK sports councils marks an important and welcome moment. By bringing parkour into the cannon of national sports, it may force urban planners and local councils to redress some of the actions taken against the sport: for instance, Horsham council are intent on banning parkour from the town centre, while “no parkour” signs are increasingly common across the country. Official recognition sends out a signal that such regressive policies should be countered. 
Parkour improves physical and mental health. It offers a way for citizens to resist the increasing privatisation taking place in cities around the world. It promotes creativity, connectivity and civic activity, all while showcasing what incredible things the human body is capable of. In many ways, parkour offers us a glimpse of the future of sport – and it’s looking bright.
https://theconversation.com/parkour-is-now-officially-a-sport-heres-to-jumping-for-joy-71243

Swimming For Science: 3D Simulations of Zebrafish Behavior May Replace Animals in Some Research

NEUROSCIENCE NEWS
Summary: A new 3D platform the simulates zebrafish behavior opens new avenues for research without the use of animals.


Source: NYU Tndon School of Engineering.

A research team headed by Professor Maurizio Porfiri has developed the first successful 3D computer modeling of the motions of zebrafish, which are increasingly the species of choice for biomedical research. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for credited to NYU Tndon School of Engineering.


Every year, approximately 20 million animals are used in scientific research. Increasingly these animals are zebrafish, which are quickly eclipsing rodents and primates as a favored species in biomedical research because of their genetic similarity to humans and their versatility. However, concerns voiced by policymakers, citizens, and scientific authorities about the number of animals used in experiments have led researchers to explore alternative, computer-based methodologies that could help reduce animal usage without compromising results. 

A team of researchers led by Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, has successfully developed the first data-driven modeling framework capable of simulating zebrafish swimming in three dimensions. It is rooted in real-life data and robust enough to potentially replace animals in some types of research, particularly neurobehavioral studies that are critical to understanding the brain.
The findings were published in Scientific Reports. The paper, entitled “In-silico Experiments of Zebrafish Behavior: Modeling Swimming in Three Dimensions,” was coauthored by Porfiri, NYU Tandon doctoral candidate Violet Mwaffo, and Sachit Butail, an assistant professor at Northern Illinois University.

Drawing analogies from the field of financial engineering, in which Mwaffo was trained, the group has made rapid progress in modeling the behavior of zebrafish from the 2D model first developed in 2015. The 3D model also features variables such as speed modulation, wall interaction, and the burst-and-coast swimming style of zebrafish. These technical improvements allow for in-silico experiments, or computer simulations, of zebrafish behavior that would otherwise require a large number of animal subjects and months of experiments.

“We’re proposing to use this zebrafish model during the pre-clinical stages of research,” said Porfiri. “While it can’t entirely replace animal testing, we expect using this model will lead to an overall decrease in the use of animal test subjects.”

The model was calibrated on a dataset of zebrafish swimming in 3D acquired by Porfiri’s group through a novel tracking framework, which was developed by Butail during his postdoctoral work at NYU Tandon.

To demonstrate the use of the model, the authors turned to scientific literature to collect data on the speed of zebrafish swimming in tanks of different dimensions at labs all over the world. The researchers observed that a correlation exists between increasing tank size and the speed of the zebrafish, and such a correlation is anticipated by in-silico experiments. Uncovering such a correlation from experiments would require thousands of animals, while computer-modeling requires only a few minutes of calculations.

While these initial results are promising, a more accurate model capable of reproducing all the behaviors of a zebrafish is still in the works. The next steps involve exploring social interaction and response to live and engineered stimuli.
ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE
Funding: The research was funded by the National Science Foundation. 
Source: Kathleen Hamilton – NYU Tndon School of Engineering 
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to NYU Tndon School of Engineering.
Original Research: Full open access research for “In-silico experiments of zebrafish behaviour: modeling swimming in three dimensions” by Violet Mwaffo, Sachit Butail & Maurizio Porfiri in Scientific Reports. Published online January 10 2017 doi:10.1038/srep39877


Abstract

In-silico experiments of zebrafish behaviour: modeling swimming in three dimensions

Zebrafish is fast becoming a species of choice in biomedical research for the investigation of functional and dysfunctional processes coupled with their genetic and pharmacological modulation. As with mammals, experimentation with zebrafish constitutes a complicated ethical issue that calls for the exploration of alternative testing methods to reduce the number of subjects, refine experimental designs, and replace live animals. Inspired by the demonstrated advantages of computational studies in other life science domains, we establish an authentic data-driven modelling framework to simulate zebrafish swimming in three dimensions. The model encapsulates burst-and-coast swimming style, speed modulation, and wall interaction, laying the foundations for in-silico experiments of zebrafish behaviour. Through computational studies, we demonstrate the ability of the model to replicate common ethological observables such as speed and spatial preference, and anticipate experimental observations on the correlation between tank dimensions on zebrafish behaviour. Reaching to other experimental paradigms, our framework is expected to contribute to a reduction in animal use and suffering.

“In-silico experiments of zebrafish behaviour: modeling swimming in three dimensions” by Violet Mwaffo, Sachit Butail & Maurizio Porfiri in Scientific Reports. Published online January 10 2017 doi:10.1038/srep39877

http://neurosciencenews.com/simulated-zebrafish-research-5939/

Harnessing Pain Relieving Properties of Cannabis Without Addictive Effects

NEUROSCIENCE NEWS
Summary: A new study suggests developing new therapeutics that use cannabinoid receptors to treat chronic pain.


Source: OHSU.

The body’s endocannabinoid system comprises receptors, endocannabinoid molecules and enzymes that make and degrade the endocannabinoids located in the brain and throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only and is credited to VICE media.


Journal of Neuroscience study examines medicinal properties of cannabis.
OHSU research suggests an avenue for developing treatments for chronic pain that harness the medicinal properties of cannabis while minimizing the threat of addiction.

The study, conducted in a rodent model, provides additional rationale for the development of therapeutics using cannabinoid receptors to treat chronic pain, which afflicts about 30 percent of the U.S. population. OHSU investigators studied the function of two forms of cell membrane receptors that bind cannabinoids that occur naturally within the body, called endocannabinoids.

“It may be an avenue where we can get better pain medications that are not addictive,” said senior author Susan Ingram, Ph.D., an associate professor of neurosurgery in the OHSU School of Medicine.

Ingram and colleagues report the treatment of chronic pain has challenged the medical system, with medications that are ineffective or create serious side effects: “However, emerging data indicate that drugs that target the endocannabinoid system might produce analgesia with fewer side effects compared with opioids.”

The body’s endocannabinoid system comprises receptors, endocannabinoid molecules and enzymes that make and degrade the endocannabinoids located in the brain and throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. The research team focused on two cannabinoid receptors, known as CB1 and CB2, in the rostral ventromedial medulla – a group of neurons located in the brainstem known to modulate pain. The study is the first to examine CB1 and CB2 receptor function at the membrane level in late adolescent and adult neurons.

The researchers observed that chronic inflammatory pain increased activity of CB2 receptors and decreased CB1 activity. Cannabis activates both CB1 and CB2 receptors equally. The study suggests that selective activation of CB2 receptors contributes to the medicinal benefit of cannabis while minimizing the propensity of the other cannabinoid receptor, CB1, to induce tolerance and withdrawal. Ingram said the next phase of the research will further explore this area of brain circuitry, which ultimately could lead to the development of a new class of pain medications.
ABOUT THIS PAIN RESEARCH ARTICLE
Co-authors include lead author Ming-Hua Li, Ph.D., and Katherine L. Suchland, both with the Department of Neurological Surgery, OHSU School of Medicine.
Funding: The study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (DA035316 and R56NS093894) and American Heart Association (13SDG14590005, MH.L.).
Source: Erik Robinson – OHSU
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to VICE media and is licensed CC BY SA 4.0.
Original Research: Abstract for “Compensatory activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptor inhibition of GABA release in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in inflammatory pain” by Ming-Hua Li, Katherine L. Suchland and Susan L. Ingram in Journal of Neuroscience. Published online December 9 2016 doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1310-16.2016


Abstract

Compensatory activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptor inhibition of GABA release in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in inflammatory pain

The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is a relay in the descending pain modulatory system and an important site of endocannabinoid modulation of pain. Endocannabinoids inhibit GABA release in the RVM but it is not known if this effect persists in chronic pain states. In the present studies, persistent inflammation induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) increased GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). Endocannabinoid activation of cannabinoid (CB1) receptors known to inhibit presynaptic GABA release was significantly reduced in the RVM of CFA-treated rats compared to naïve rats. The reduction in CFA-treated rats correlated with decreased CB1 receptor protein expression and function in the RVM. Paradoxically, the non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN55,212 inhibited GABAergic mIPSCs in both naïve and CFA-treated rats. However, WIN55,212 inhibition was reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant in naïve rats but not in CFA-treated rats. WIN55,212-mediated inhibition in CFA-treated rats was blocked by the CB2 receptor-selective antagonist SR144528 indicating that CB2 receptor function in the RVM is increased during persistent inflammation. Consistent with these results, CB2 receptor agonists, AM1241 and GW405833 inhibited GABAergic mIPSC frequency only in CFA-treated rats and the inhibition was reversed with SR144258. When administered alone, SR144528 and another CB2 receptor-selective antagonist AM630 increased mIPSC frequency in the RVM of CFA-treated rats indicating that CB2 receptors are tonically activated by endocannabinoids. Our data provide evidence that CB2 receptor function emerges in the RVM in persistent inflammation and that selective CB2 receptor agonists may be useful for treatment of persistent inflammatory pain.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT
These studies demonstrate that endocannabinoid signaling to CB1- and CB2-receptors in adult RVM is altered in persistent inflammation. The emergence of CB2 receptor function in the RVM provides additional rationale for the development of CB2 receptor-selective agonists as useful therapeutics for chronic inflammatory pain.

“Compensatory activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptor inhibition of GABA release in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in inflammatory pain” by Ming-Hua Li, Katherine L. Suchland and Susan L. Ingram in Journal of Neuroscience. Published online December 9 2016 doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1310-16.2016

http://neurosciencenews.com/pain-relief-neurology-5928/

Our Senses Can’t Learn Under Stress

NEUROSCIENCE NEWS
Summary: Stress may impede perceptual learning and performance, a new study reports.


Source: RUB.

To make training comparable across all participants, the researchers employed the well-established approach of passive finger stimulation. Previous studies and several therapy approaches have shown that this method leads to an improved tactile acuity. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only.


Stress is part of our everyday lives – while some thrive on it, it makes others sick. But what does stress do to our senses?

When we train them, we can sharpen our senses thereby improve our perceptual performance. The stress hormone cortisol completely blocks this important ability. In the current issue of “Psychoneuroendocrinology” neuroscientists of the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) report on this finding.

“Previous research has already shown that stress can prevent the retrieval of memories. But now we have discovered that it also has a major effect on our perception and perceptual learning,” explains Dr Hubert Dinse, one of the authors of the study.

Tactile sense in training

In their study, researchers investigated how the sense of touch of 30 study participants could be changed after a training phase. Half of them received a medium dose of the stress hormone cortisol, while the other half received a placebo drug.

To make training comparable across all participants, the researchers employed the well-established approach of passive finger stimulation. Previous studies and several therapy approaches have shown that this method leads to an improved tactile acuity.

Tactile performance was assessed using the so-called “two-point discrimination threshold”. This marker indicates how far apart two stimuli need to be, to be discriminated as two separate sensations – the closer they are, the better the sense of touch.

No learning effect after cortisol
The placebo group improved their tactile acuity, as expected, by about 15 percent. In contrast, the cortisol given to the other group blocked almost all the stimulation-induced improvement. Cognitive psychologist Prof Dr Oliver T. Wolf explains:” Our data show that a single dose of cortisol not only disrupts memory in the hippocampus, but it also has a substantial effect on the plasticity of sensory areas of the brain.”

Cortisol blocks synaptic connections
In previous studies on a cellular level, neuroscientists have demonstrated that cortisol suppresses the strengthening of synaptic connections, and therefore the plasticity of the brain – its ability to learn. The team led by Hubert Dinse therefore suggests, their results could also explain by cortisol-induced suppression of synaptic plasticity.

Effects on clinical treatments
The results of the study could also affect clinical treatments. Corticosteroids, of which cortisol is one, are often used in the treatment of immunological and neurological diseases. However, the effects on perceptual learning observed in this study may counteract rehabilitation efforts, which rely on just these mechanisms. It is therefore necessary to find out which effects the clinical treatment with these substances has on learning mechanisms in the brain.
ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE
Funding: Scientists from the fields of neuroinformatics and cognitive psychology, as well as from the Neurological Clinic Bergmannsheil collaborated on this research project. They were all funded by a grant to Collaborative Research Centre 874 from the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG)
Source: Hubert Dinse – RUB 
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Full open access research for “The stress hormone cortisol blocks perceptual learning in humans” by Hubert R. Dinse, Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Melanie Lenz, Martin Tegenthoff, and Oliver T. Wolf in Psychoneuroendocrinology. Published online December 9 2016 doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.12.002


Abstract

The stress hormone cortisol blocks perceptual learning in humans
Cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid (GC) in humans, influences neuronal excitability and plasticity by acting on mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. Cellular studies demonstrated that elevated GC levels affect neuronal plasticity, for example through a reduction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). At the behavioural level, after treatment with GCs, numerous studies have reported impaired hippocampal function, such as impaired memory retrieval. In contrast, relatively little is known about the impact of GCs on cortical plasticity and perceptual learning in adult humans. Therefore, in this study, we explored the impact of elevated GC levels on human perceptual learning. To this aim, we used a training-independent learning approach, where lasting changes in human perception can be induced by applying passive repetitive sensory stimulation (rss), the timing of which was determined from cellular LTP studies. In our placebo-controlled double-blind study, we used tactile LTP-like stimulation to induce improvements in tactile acuity (spatial two-point discrimination). Our results show that a single administration of hydrocortisone (30 mg) completely blocked rss-induced changes in two-point discrimination. In contrast, the placebo group showed the expected rss-induced increase in two-point discrimination of over 14%. Our data demonstrate that high GC levels inhibit rss-induced perceptual learning. We suggest that the suppression of LTP, as previously reported in cellular studies, may explain the perceptual learning impairments observed here.

“The stress hormone cortisol blocks perceptual learning in humans” by Hubert R. Dinse, Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth, Melanie Lenz, Martin Tegenthoff, and Oliver T. Wolf in Psychoneuroendocrinology. Published online December 9 2016 doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.12.002

http://neurosciencenews.com/stress-learning-senses-5942/

Punch Out raises $10,000 to help people with Parkinson's

January 13, 2017

Adam and Sara O'hare of Wilmette, from left, Sherry and Sherwin Zuckerman of Glencoe (Rock Steady Boxing Windy City)


Event: Punch Out for Parkinson's
Funding: Weekly exercise classes, support and education resources that create a better quality of life for people with Parkinson's Disease
Hosted by: Rock Steady Boxing Windy City Movement Revolution, Neuro Intensive Training Center in Deerfield
Date: Dec. 1
Attended: 100
Raised: $10,000
http://health.einnews.com/article/361917820/Cn0T_tdcZZEjdrEJ?lcf=Hzf-KE6h-Xmcpvzwcdl3CuzbRmZ8XaTUdg3y3lN96pg%3D

Damien Hirst and Grayson Perry among artists involved in Parkinson's fundraising project

January 14, 2017   By 

The artists have all created original artwork within Perspex cubes symbolising 

Parkinson's disease.


Damien Hirst is among celebrity artists who are creating original art for the Cure Parkinson's 


Some of the world's leading artists are taking place in an intriguing project to raise awareness of Parkinson's disease, and raise money to try and find a cure for the debilitating condition.
Damien HirstGrayson Perry, Sarah Lucas, Peter Blake, and Jake and Dinos Chapman are all taking part in Cure³ for the charity Cure Parkinson's Trust (CPT).
The project was devised by Artwise in collaboration with the David Ross Foundation and Bonham's.
Each artist involved has created an original artwork small enough to fit inside a transparent Perspex box. Cure Parkinson's Trust co-founder Tom Isaacs, who suffers from the disease, told Sky News the response has been "bonkers".
"It's one of those things that has just gathered momentum and we're really excited about the prospect of this exhibition," said Isaacs. "Parkinson's is like being trapped in a box, it's not a terminal condition but it is a life sentence, one without parole, and what we are trying to do is to raise the money to pay the bail and get people out."
Parkinson's is a degenerative neurological condition that affects an estimated 127,000 people in the UK and 10 million worldwide. As yet there is no cure for the disease, whose victims include Mohammed Ali, Johnny Cash and Michael J Fox, who has lived with the condition since being diagnosed at the age of 30 in 1991. Fox has established a charity, the Michael J Fox Foundation, to try and find a cure the disease.
Dutch ceramic artist Bouke de Vries, whose partner was diagnosed with Parkinson's 15 years ago, features Buddhist goddess of compassion Guanyin as a broken figure within his box.
"I've lived with the symptoms and the impact it's had on his life and my life," said de Vries. "To see him having to struggle to get a spoon lifted to his mouth, it's very sad and so frustrating because he wants so much to be normal, but the Parkinson's holds him back."
Over 50 artists are to create selling art exhibition in aid of the cure parkinson's trust at 
http://www. 23172/ 

New Technology Brings Independence To People Suffering From ALS, Parkinson’s

January 13, 2017


NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Imagine never being able to make a phone call in private.
That’s the reality for millions of people suffering from disabilities like ALS, paralysis, Parkinson’s and more.
Now, as CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported new technology is providing independence for those who don’t have use of their limbs.
Surfing the internet, reading a newspaper, sending an email, even making a phone call can be acts that we take for granted.
“I was left paralyzed from the neck down in a car accident. Ever since then I’ve been unable to do simple things like make a private phone call on my own,” Tracy Todd said.
New technology can enable disabled people to use their smartphones just like anyone else.
“I would really like to order flowers for my wife for our 44th anniversary,” Giora Livne said.
“If you imagine someone sitting at home and not being able to move, that is a window to a world of content and human interaction,” Sesame founder Oded Bendov explained.
Bendov — an Israeli computer scientist — and his quadriplegic colleague Livne, created the new technology known as Sesame Phone.
“We’re called Sesame because of ‘open Sesame.’ We’re opening worlds for our users for people who are paralyzed at home,” Bendov said.
The phone uses facial recognition to read a person’s head movements.
“If I move my head left and right the cursor goes left and right,” Bendov said.
It allows users to open apps, send emails, go on Facebook, and play games without the use of their hands.
The Sesame phone is one of several new inventions designed to help the disabled. RewaLk’s bionic exoskeleton is giving paraplegics the ability to stand and walk again, and OrCam uses visual recognition to help the visually impaired to read books, signs, labels, and even faces.
The Sesame Phone is currently available through Android7.
Bendov said he’s working with various veterans groups in the U.S. to subsidize the technology so it’s available to more people.

Video:

New Technology Brings Independence To People Suffering From ALS, Parkinson’s: That's the reality for millions of people suffering from disabilities like ALS, paralysis, Parkinson's and more.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/01/13/technology-for-people-with-disabilities/#.WHph-WLjEjw.blogger

WATCH: Music therapy helps Parkinson's patient walk

January 13, 2017




 - A physical therapist working with a patient with Parkinson's disease was astonished at the results when she added music to the mix to help him walk and she caught the amazing before and after on video.
Anicea Gunlock of Oklahoma has been a physical therapy assistant for about five years. She began working with her patient, "Larry," in December, and had recently read a study about incorporating music into the therapy and decided to try it.
"I went home, did a little research and came across a study that used music to aid in facilitating a more natural gait pattern," Gunlock said.
With Parkinson's disease, the disorder of the nervous system is progressive and affects movement. Sometimes it begins with a tremor in the hand and then will worsen over time to affect other limbs, mobility, balance, coordination and speech. Though there is no cure, treatments and therapy can help treat symptoms.
The results of this therapy session, which were captured on video she posted to Facebook, show a remarkable difference in Larry's walking with music and without.
At first, video shows Larry walking through the house with difficulty using his walker. When Gunlock played the song on her phone with a good rhythm to walk to, Larry began to move smoothly, walking without a hitch.
"I don't know who was more shocked at the immediate results!" she posted.
Gunlock told FOX 13 that his wife followed them around the house crying and laughing and saying she couldn't believe it. "She said she had been praying for a miracle for her husband and truly felt like this was an answered prayer!" Gunlock said.
As the song played, Larry began to sing the words to the song, and even eventually pushed his walker to the side and walked for another 15 minutes without any help at all.

Gunlock said she posted the video on Facebook, which has been seen millions of times, to give others with Parkinson's hope that they might have the same results. "I have never seen results of this magnitude this quickly before and by the end of the session we were all in tears but they were definitely happy tears!" she wrote. 

Friday, January 13, 2017

Exercises To Try At Home For People With Disabilities

 January 13, 2017

When you live with a physical disability or illness, keeping fit can be difficult. 
Just 17.2% of adults with long-term limiting illness, disability or infirmity participate in weekly sport, according to statistics from Sport England.
Meanwhile, 83% of people with disabilities would like to take part in more physical activity, a poll by Parallel London found.
The reality is that issues such as poorly-equipped gyms and difficulty leaving the house mean many feel the need to get creative when it comes to exercise. And while there are plenty of at-home workouts online, very few cater to those with mobility issues.
To tackle this issue, we spoke to the founder of Disability Training, Dom Thorpe, who has some workouts and modifications to try to keep fit in 2017. 


“There are a few exercises which I like to do with clients as I find they offer great results,” explains Thorpe. “Some can be done either in a wheelchair or on any other chair, the others are to be done on the floor so some transference is necessary.
“Depending on your fitness and strength levels, you may want to vary the amount of sets and reps, but a mid point suggestion would be to perform three sets of 10 reps for each exercise. In other words, do the exercise 10 times in a row before breaking for a minute, and then repeat that two more times with a minute to break in between.”
He adds: “For a cardiovascular workout you can try a circuit by performing the exercises below in sequence with little or no rest between sets.
“Try doing one set of each exercise before moving onto the next and once you’ve completed them all, you can break for a couple of minutes before repeating the circuit a few more times.” 

1. Sit To Stand


Sit on a chair and stand up straight, keeping your posture straight, and return back to a sitting position.
“This is great if you have a weakened lower body and need to increase lower body strength and stability,” says Thorpe. 
“If you need assistance, place your hands on your knees to help with the push or if your legs are very weak, you could try using a support bar attached to the wall (if you have one).
“If you are in a wheelchair, pull yourself up out of the chair while attempting to put as much force through the legs as possible.”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis, motor neurone disorders and other conditions where some control over the lower body is present.

2. Seated Tricep Dips


Sit on an armchair and lift your body upwards using your arms, not your hips. Slowly lower your body back down again by bending your elbows. 
“This exercise strengthens the triceps, chest and front of the shoulders,” says Thorpe. “Strengthening those parts of the body improves the ability to transfer from wheelchair to other seats or the bed.”
He adds: “If you don’t quite have the arm strength you can use your legs to assist you slightly (assuming you have some strength in the legs).”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis, motor neurone disorders and other conditions where good strength of the upper body is present.

3. Sit And Walk


Place two chairs opposite one another in your home. Stand up from one chair, utilising your core and legs to aid movement, and then walk to the other chair and sit down. Repeat. 
“This is a great way to improve your walking,” says Thorpe. “The benefits are two-fold. The sit-to-stand strengthens the legs and the short walk serves to improve... yep you guessed it, walking.
“The exercise can be done with assistance, crutches or a partner until gradual improvements are made at which point the assistance can be reduced stage by stage.
“You can also vary the distance between the chairs for a bigger workout.”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis, motor neurone disorders and other conditions where some control over the lower body is present.

4. Reverse Crunches


Sit with your feet out in front of you, knees bent slightly and arms stretched forwards. Slowly lower your body down towards the floor, engaging your core.
Once you are lying down, bring your body around to the side and use your arms to help you sit upright again.  
“This core exercise is perfect for when you want to strengthen your abdominal muscles but you aren’t strong enough to do a normal crunch or a sit up,” says Thorpe.
“If you are struggling, use your hands to grip your knees or thighs to help guide you slowly.”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis, motor neurone disorders and other conditions where some control over abdominal muscles is present.

5. Dorsal Raises / Seated Back Extensions

Lie face down on the floor with your legs slightly spread and your arms bent so that your hands are face down by the side of your head (see video above).
Slowly lift your upper half and legs upwards, away from the floor, and then come back down again. Make sure you’re using your back muscles to do this. 
“This is important to do after reverse crunches as abdominal exercises need to be balanced out with an exercise to work the lower back muscles,” says Thorpe. 
“If you struggle to bring yourself back up to an upright position you can assist by using your hands to press on your thighs.”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis and motor neurone disorders.

6. Kneel To Stand


Begin by kneeling down. Slowly, place one foot in front of you and lift your entire body up so that you are standing, keeping your arms by your sides. Then come back down to kneel again on the floor and repeat. 
“This is a challenging exercise for strengthening the lower body and assisting with balance, stability and mobility,” explains Thorpe.
“It can really get the heart rate up too, if you’re not used to doing cardiovascular exercise or if you are overweight.”
He adds: “If you struggle with balance you can use one arm to support yourself on a table, door handle or wall.”
Suitable for: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, obesity, mild cerebral palsy, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, partial lower body paralysis, motor neurone disorders and other conditions where good control over the lower body is present.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/exercises-to-do-at-home-if-you-have-a-disability_uk_5878b3bfe4b0f3b82a37408e